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Fluid Migration Mechanisms due to Faulty Well Design and/or Construction

AN OVERVIEW AND RECENT EXPERIENCES IN THE PENNSYLVANIA MARCELLUS PLAY BY ANTHONY R. INGRAFFEA, PH.D., P.E.
JANUARY, 2013

INTRODUCTION: LOSS OF WELL STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY

An overall description of mechanisms by which oil and gas wells can develop gas and other fluid leaks can be found in Dusseault et al. (2000). These mechanisms can be exacerbated with repeated pressurization of the casing, with open-annulus sections along the casing, and with high gas pressures encountering curing cement or entering such open-hole sections. All of these exacerbating factors lead to more rapid occurrence and upward growth of circumferential fractures, essentially disbonding, in the rock-cement and /or the cement-casing interface.

A schematic depiction of the phenomenon of gas, or additional fluid, migration upwards along a wellbore is presented in Figure 1a, for the simplest case of bypass by disbonding along the surface casing. Figure 2 is a close-up schematic showing other possible fluid pathways. Additional layers of casing and attendant cement interfaces, present in the defective wells in question, do not eliminate these phenomenon; they may, in fact, increase its likelihood. Figure 3 is a snapshot of yet another situation in which an intermediate casing annulus is left un-cemented, but open to a shallow gas source.

These phenomena are not rare in the oil and gas industry. Data on failure rates for cement jobs leading to sustained casing pressure and possible fluid migration into USDW can be found, for example, in Figure 4 from Brufatto et al. (2003), who state:

“Since the earliest gas wells, uncontrolled migration of hydrocarbons to the surface has challenged the oil and gas industry…many of today’s wells are at risk. Failure to isolate sources of hydrocarbon either early in the well-construction process or long after production begins has resulted in abnormally pressurized casing strings and leaks of gas into zones that would otherwise not be gas bearing”.

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